Projects

Core Amphibians and Reptiles Collection

Core Amphibians and Reptiles Project

Interested in the amphibians and reptiles of the Carolinas and the Southeast? The North Carolina Museum of Natural Science’s amphibians and reptiles collection was started in the late 1800s by Museum co-founder C.S. Brimley and today contains approximately 265,000 specimens of salamanders, frogs, turtles, crocodilians, lizards, and snakes. This collection is one of the largest and most complete regional collections in the U.S., and provides critically important information on past and present geographic distributions of these species in our region. So hop on into this project, and help us make these data available to the world!

  • Number of Transcriptions: 11276
  • Number of Transcribers: 54
Duke Marine Invertebrates Project

Duke Marine Invertebrates Project

Discover the weird and wonderful from shallow beach waters to the deep ocean! From mud dragons to slipper lobsters, comb jellies to sea squirts, oysters to octopuses, the Carolinas are home to an astounding diversity of marine invertebrates. Starting in the late 1930s, research scientists at the Duke Marine Laboratory played an integral role in documenting the biological diversity of the western Atlantic Ocean. The resulting collection was recently donated to the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, and provides insight needed for effective conservation and management of marine communities. So scutter on into this project, and help us make these data available to the world!

Project Complete!

  • Number of Transcriptions: 3563
  • Number of Transcribers: 37
Charleston Invertebrates Project

Charleston Invertebrates Project

Tarantulas and sea biscuits and snails, OH MY! Spanning an area extending from the Atlantic Ocean to the Appalachian Mountains, the Carolinas provide a backdrop for a unique and hyper-diverse invertebrate fauna, many of which are yet to be described, or even discovered. The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences recently acquired a collection of marine, freshwater, and terrestrial invertebrates dating back to the 1800s. This collection provides invaluable information on the distribution of an impressive array of species over time, each with a unique story to tell. So creep on into this project, and help us make these data available to the world!

Project Complete!

  • Number of Transcriptions: 8840
  • Number of Transcribers: 33
Charleston Fishes Collection

Charleston Fishes Project

Ever wondered what lived in the rivers and coastal waterways of the Carolinas 200 years ago? We can find out using data from this recently acquired collection from the Charleston Museum which dates back to the 1800s! This historical snapshot not only tells us what lived in these waters long ago, but helps to document changes in the biodiversity of the Carolinas over time. This collection is an essential resource for the conservation and management of many species of fish. So cast your line into this project and help us make these data available to the world!

Project Complete!

  • Number of Transcriptions: 3578
  • Number of Transcribers: 43
Charleston Amphibians and Reptiles Collection

Charleston Amphibians and Reptiles Project

Curious about the amphibians and reptiles discovered by scientific explorers around the world, or maybe those encountered by plantation workers in the Low Country of the Carolinas back in the 1800s? We recently acquired a historic collection of scientific specimens of salamanders, frogs, turtles, crocodilians, lizards, and snakes from the Charleston Museum. This collection provides critically important information on past geographic distributions of these species. So slither on into this project, and help us make these data available to the world!

Project Complete!

  • Number of Transcriptions: 2825
  • Number of Transcribers: 58
Duke Marine Lab Project

Duke Marine Lab Project

North Carolina is home to a staggering diversity of marine fishes, with new species still waiting to be discovered. Documenting the extent of this species richness is a monumental task. Over the last century, scientists at the Duke University Marine Laboratory have been using research vessels to gather a more complete picture of what lives below the surface of the sea. The resulting collection, which was recently donated to our Museum, spans decades and represents a truly remarkable snapshot of the Western Atlantic Ocean. This collection is incredibly important for marine science and conservation. Dive into this project and help us make it available to the world!

Project Complete!

  • Number of Transcriptions: 331
  • Number of Transcribers: 18